Considering Color Blind Readers When Designing Web Pages

Thanks to a CyberKen follower’s comment  I was made aware that readers with color blindness may have difficulty with at least some of the posts here.  An article in About.com entitled, “Are Your Web Pages Color Sensitive?” explains that most of the problems regarding color blindness relate to distinguishing red from green.  The article gives some helpful tips for designing web pages with this disability in mind.

Since I am a photographer, and post color pictures here fairly frequently, some readers with color blindness may not have been able to perceive distinctions in colors to which I referred in past posts.  I apologize. I will certainly keep posting color photos, but will be more aware now that some readers may not be able to appreciate critical comments relating to color.


3 Comments

  • i absolutely love all your posting style, very attractive,
    don’t quit as well as keep penning in all honesty , because it simply nicely to read it.
    impatient to view alot more of your current posts, good bye!

  • TCDavis says:

    Yes, sorry for the confusion. My last paragraph referred to a photo I had taken with a red rose in the foreground, and way in the background, almost at the horizon, a person wearing a bright red coat. I took that photo because of the way that the color in the foreground led the eye to the background. This is something that photographers with a good sense of design try to do: lead the viewer’s eye from the foreground to the background so that the whole scene is taken in. But of course, in that particular instance persons with color blindness wouldn’t appreciate what I was doing. They would not be able to perceive the similarity in color in the foreground and background.

    Peace,
    TCDavis

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